DID YOU SEE: the New York Times on A Frenchwoman’s Guide to Sex After Sixty

Judith Newman writes a monthly column for the Sunday New York Times Book Review about self-help books. In yesterday’s paper, she led with a capsule review of Marie de Hennezel’s A Frenchwoman’s Guide to Sex After Sixty that so beautifully articulates a philosophy of sex at any age that I can’t resist quoting that passage in full. The book, Newman writes,

immediately catches your attention because the cover shows a woman of a certain age glancing coquettishly over the bedsheets. But that age isn’t 40. It’s perhaps 75. So this isn’t the American version of old; it’s the French version, which is to say: old. And that’s what makes this volume uniquely French: It’s deeply un-American in its realism. Aches and pains, medications that reduce libido, a diminution of hormones that mean friction is tougher on our naughty bits and of course the occasional urge to cover all the mirrors in the house: Aging ain’t pretty, Hennezel admits. Yet for many of us, Eros lives, and Eros wants its due. What’s called for, then, is a revolution in the way we look at sexuality: a de-emphasis on orgasms in favor of kissing and caressing, more solo play to connect with our erotic selves and “making affection” as an alternative to making love. Feeling good through exercise and a healthy diet is paramount; looking younger through plastic surgery is mentioned not at all. Reading the stories of septuagenarians and octogenarians who are finding love or intimacy or sometimes just sex, one is reminded that the very French concept of joie de vivre — a sense of joy that comes from curiosity and playfulness, from looking outward instead of inward — is its own form of Botox.

You can check out Newman’s whole column online here.

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